government government wholesale-trade wholesale-trade mining mining utilities utilities other other rail rail waste-management waste-management administrative-style administrative-style manufacturing manufacturing equipment-repair equipment-repair

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Lockout/Tagout For Government

Job safety is a high priority in most government jobs. Units of government feel obligated to set a high standard. For this reason, some of the most useful and sophisticated lockout/tagout procedures can be found in federal, state and local employment manuals.

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Lockout/Tagout For Wholesale Trade & Distribution

American commerce has revised its methods in the past few decades for distributing goods and products. Large wholesale warehouses have become the norm. Mammoth distribution centers near interstate highways are common and employ thousands of American workers.

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Lockout/Tagout For Mining

According to the United States Department of Labor, between January of 2000 and December of 2008, there were 23 fatalities resulting from accidents caused by failing to follow proper lockout/tagout procedures in the American mining industry.

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Lockout/Tagout For Utilities

There are many industry-specific rules on lockout/tagout in electric utilities. These have resulted from the realization that the companies energy generating requirements include both external power and energy to operate the plant itself. This has resulted in programs and processes designed exclusively for power-generating companies.

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Lockout/Tagout For Other Industries

Some industries have two or more workers simultaneously working on separate parts of a large system, it requires a “group lockout”. Color coded locks in a variety of shapes and sizes ensure that each component of the equipment or machinery has it’s own safety device.

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Lockout/Tagout For Rail Transportation

The loading process, which often involves equipment and machinery that requires regularly scheduled service, can be very dangerous without proper training and procedures. Lockout/tagout procedures keep employees from falling victim to load shifts and equipment surges that can result from uncontrolled stored energy.

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Lockout/Tagout For Waste Management

Waste management and recycling industries perform valuable services that often involve large trucks with powerful components. Thousands of American workers are injured or even killed every year by unanticipated energizing, startup or release of machinery or equipment.

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Lockout/Tagout For Administrative Style Buildings

Lockout/tagout procedures for administrative style buildings are relatively easy to create, due to most of the equipment for these buildings being similar in nature. Even though the equipment itself is normally pretty uniform, the energy sources used in office buildings, schools, hospitals and other administrative buildings can vary widely. For that reason, a clear, thorough lockout/tagout procedure manual/document is vital to keeping employees safe.

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Lockout/Tagout For Manufacturing

The machinery and equipment used in the manufacturing process is often powerful and dangerous and it is vital that it be properly controlled and monitored. There are two types of activities that need to be considered when designing your lockout/tagout program. One is the protection of employees and contractors performing service and maintenance on those machines. The other is the protection of workers who use the machines on a routine basis.

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Lockout/Tagout For Equipment Repair Services

OSHA requires that employers control hazardous energy during service and maintenance of all types of equipment. Examples of equipment that can be affected by stored energy include maintenance equipment, hoists, automotive lifts, material handling equipment, and other machinery.

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